The issues of misconstrued facts in freakonomics a non fiction book by steven d levitt and stephen j

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The issues of misconstrued facts in freakonomics a non fiction book by steven d levitt and stephen j

Dubner is a journalist from New York Times. Together they produced this maverick work. According to Levitt, Economics is a science with excellent tools for gaining answers but a serious shortage of interesting questions.

Levitt raises some interesting questions like why do drug leaders still live with their mothers, what do school teachers and sumo wrestlers in common, do parents really matter, which is more dangerous: Levitt argues that the conventional wisdom is often wrong.

He laments as to how experts like criminologists, real estate agents and political scientists twist facts to obfuscate the truth. What he has done is to strip the out layers of the modern life and attempt to look beneath to ferret out For this, if he had to depend on the score sheets of the school children or crime records of the New York Police or abortion statistics, he had to go for those.

Some of the questions asked may be innocuous and some may relate to life and death issues. The book is not earth shaking, but interesting. If not anything else, this book teaches as to how not to take every maxim at its value and as to how to ask weird and strange questions which may yield some interesting answers some times.

I feel that this knowledge is important not only for Economics, but even for other forms of Science. One advantage with this book is that you need not read this book continuously. Each chapter is independent of the other and therefore, you can do piece meal reading.What are the best books you've ever read?

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The issues of misconstrued facts in freakonomics a non fiction book by steven d levitt and stephen j

Freakonomics - Steven D Levitt and Stephen J Dubner: Can economics be interesting?? Really??! Here is a book exploring the sex appeal,if you will of economics. Below is an excerpt from their web page, talking more about the book.

What are the best fiction books you've ever. "Super Freakonomics the second book, once again a really witty and interesting book dealing with economics in unexpected ways." "Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner return with SuperFreakonomics, and fans and newcomers alike will find that the freakquel is even bolder, funnier, and more surprising than the first." "Superfreakonomics".

The New York Times bestselling Freakonomics was a worldwide sensation, selling more than 4 million copies in 35 languages, and changing the way we look at the world. Authors Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J.

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Dubner followed it up withSuperFreakonomics, a Freakquel that hardcore fans and newcomers alike have found to be even bolder, funnier, and more surprising than the first. The New York Times bestselling Freakonomics changed the way we see the world, exposing the hidden side of just about everything.

Then came SuperFreakonomics, a documentary film, an award-winning podcast, and more. Now, with Think Like a Freak, Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner have written their most revolutionary book yet. No Fluff Just Stuff Anthology p1 0. Uploaded by Wil Pannell.

Save. No Fluff Just Stuff Anthology p1 0. For Later. save. Related. { br.J AVA I S D iridis-photo-restoration.comtackTrace(). these issues can be showstoppers. I could shorten this example by a few lines here and there.*. we are moving into a new era where Java is now a platform .

The Hidden Side of Freakonomics Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner is a book aimed at exposing the secret within everything. The authors prove that in many cases, two items don’t have to be connected because they are correlated.

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